• Case 8: Meet the Conlangers, right

    [...]
    (Middle left) Sonja Elen Kisa

    Creator of Toki Pona

    Canada

    Especially for this exhibit, Sonja Elen Kisa described herself as "a 29-year-old Queer Acadian (French-Canadian) woman currently living in Toronto, Canada. She designed the minimal language Toki Pona in 2001 after a period of depression, as she sought to simplify her life and find the true meaning behind things. She is currently studying to become a speech-language pathologist." Kisa was the subject of an article in The Globe and Mail, a major Toronto newspaper, in July 2007. According to that source, around 100 people speak Toki Pona fluently, mostly in chat rooms and blogs. Even more interesting are the facts that a "Colorado programmer is developing an apocalyptic computer game with Toki Pona as the spoken language [and an] Israeli-German singer and member of the Stuttgart Chamber Choir is including it in a concert of musical pieces composed in constructed languages, alongside Esperanto and Star Trek's Klingon." An example of the language is the proverb "Nasin ante li pona tawa jan ante: Different ways are good for different people (i.e. different strokes for different folks)."



    The Babel Text in Toki Pona

    1.ma ali li jo e toki wan en sama.

    2.jan ali li kama tan nasin pi kama suno, li kama lon ma Sinale, li awen lon ni.

    3.jan li toki e ni: "o kama! mi mute o pali e kiwen tomo, o seli e ona."

    4.jan mute li toki e ni: "o kama! mi mute o pali e ma tomo e tomo palisa suli. lawa pi tomo palisa li lon sewi kon.

    5.o nimi pi mi mute li kama suli! mi wile ala e ni: mi mute li kan ala. mi mute li lon ma ali."

    6.jan sewi Jawe li kama anpa, li lukin e ma tomo e tomo palisa pi jan lili mute.

    7.jan sewi Jawe li toki e ni: "jan ni li jo e ma wan, li jo e toki sama, li pali e tomo palisa. tenpo ni la ona mute li ken pali mute ike. mi wile tawa anpa, mi pakala e toki pi jan mute ni. o jan li sona ala e toki pi jan ante."

    8.jan sewi Jawe li pali e ni: jan ali li poki ala jan, li lon ma mute, li ken ala pali e ma tomo.

    9.nimi pi ma tomo ni li Pape tan ni: jan sewi Jawe li pakala e toki pi jan ali. tan ma tomo Pape la jan sewi Jawe li tawa e jan tawa ma mute.

    (www.omniglot.com/babel/tokipona.htm)
    [...]

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/26418663@N05/2478688443/

    #TokiPona #janSonja #konlan #anno2008
    Case 8: Meet the Conlangers, right [...] (Middle left) Sonja Elen Kisa Creator of Toki Pona Canada Especially for this exhibit, Sonja Elen Kisa described herself as "a 29-year-old Queer Acadian (French-Canadian) woman currently living in Toronto, Canada. She designed the minimal language Toki Pona in 2001 after a period of depression, as she sought to simplify her life and find the true meaning behind things. She is currently studying to become a speech-language pathologist." Kisa was the subject of an article in The Globe and Mail, a major Toronto newspaper, in July 2007. According to that source, around 100 people speak Toki Pona fluently, mostly in chat rooms and blogs. Even more interesting are the facts that a "Colorado programmer is developing an apocalyptic computer game with Toki Pona as the spoken language [and an] Israeli-German singer and member of the Stuttgart Chamber Choir is including it in a concert of musical pieces composed in constructed languages, alongside Esperanto and Star Trek's Klingon." An example of the language is the proverb "Nasin ante li pona tawa jan ante: Different ways are good for different people (i.e. different strokes for different folks)." The Babel Text in Toki Pona 1.ma ali li jo e toki wan en sama. 2.jan ali li kama tan nasin pi kama suno, li kama lon ma Sinale, li awen lon ni. 3.jan li toki e ni: "o kama! mi mute o pali e kiwen tomo, o seli e ona." 4.jan mute li toki e ni: "o kama! mi mute o pali e ma tomo e tomo palisa suli. lawa pi tomo palisa li lon sewi kon. 5.o nimi pi mi mute li kama suli! mi wile ala e ni: mi mute li kan ala. mi mute li lon ma ali." 6.jan sewi Jawe li kama anpa, li lukin e ma tomo e tomo palisa pi jan lili mute. 7.jan sewi Jawe li toki e ni: "jan ni li jo e ma wan, li jo e toki sama, li pali e tomo palisa. tenpo ni la ona mute li ken pali mute ike. mi wile tawa anpa, mi pakala e toki pi jan mute ni. o jan li sona ala e toki pi jan ante." 8.jan sewi Jawe li pali e ni: jan ali li poki ala jan, li lon ma mute, li ken ala pali e ma tomo. 9.nimi pi ma tomo ni li Pape tan ni: jan sewi Jawe li pakala e toki pi jan ali. tan ma tomo Pape la jan sewi Jawe li tawa e jan tawa ma mute. (www.omniglot.com/babel/tokipona.htm) [...] https://www.flickr.com/photos/26418663@N05/2478688443/ #TokiPona #janSonja #konlan #anno2008
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Art in Focus: Therapy Notebook 1, pp. 1-6 by Eoin McHugh
    Sketchbook drawings take spirit of simplified Toki Pona language and apply it to images
    Aidan Dunne | Oct 19, 2019

    https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/art-and-design/visual-art/art-in-focus-therapy-notebook-1-pp-1-6-by-eoin-mchugh-1.4050202

    #TokiPona #EoinMcHugh #art #musi #anno2019
    Art in Focus: Therapy Notebook 1, pp. 1-6 by Eoin McHugh Sketchbook drawings take spirit of simplified Toki Pona language and apply it to images Aidan Dunne | Oct 19, 2019 https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/art-and-design/visual-art/art-in-focus-therapy-notebook-1-pp-1-6-by-eoin-mchugh-1.4050202 #TokiPona #EoinMcHugh #art #musi #anno2019
    Art in Focus: Therapy Notebook 1, pp. 1-6 by Eoin McHugh
    Sketchbook drawings take spirit of simplified Toki Pona language and apply it to images
    WWW.IRISHTIMES.COM
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • A 123-Word Language That Can Be Learned In Under A Week
    And its creator hopes it can help you chill.

    https://archive.is/4qxYv

    #TokiPona #article #lipu_sitelen #anno2019 (estimate)

    A 123-Word Language That Can Be Learned In Under A Week And its creator hopes it can help you chill. https://archive.is/4qxYv #TokiPona #article #lipu_sitelen #anno2019 (estimate)
    A 123-Word Language That Can Be Learned In Under A Week
    And its creator hopes it can help you chill.
    ARCHIVE.IS
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Taken by someone special lysm baby
    Taken by someone special lysm baby :heart:
    6
    4 Comments 0 Shares
  • The Study of Machine Translation Aspects Through Constructed Languages

    Evangelos C. Papakitsos1, *, Ioannis Giachos2

    1Department of Education, School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, Iraklio Attikis, Greece

    2Department of Linguistics, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    Abstract

    The present paper describes a software system that performs bidirectional machine translation between two constructed languages. These languages are made by one or more persons, for various purposes. Such an important purpose is the development of easy and almost natural communication interfaces with robots. Despite the linguistic simplicity of the constructed languages, the automated translation from one to the other confronts some of the fundamental algorithmic challenges that are also encountered in the machine translation of natural languages. Hence, the usage of constructed languages can be an easier way both to train linguistic engineers in developing machine translation software and to study the linking of different robotic interfaces, as a novel field of research.

    Keywords

    Natural Language Understanding, Constructed Language, Machine Translation, Human-Computer Interaction

    Received: June 13, 2016
    Accepted: June 25, 2016
    Published online: July 21, 2016

    @ 2016 The Authors. Published by American Institute of Science. This Open Access article is under the CC BY license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

    http://files.aiscience.org/journal/article/html/70580008.html

    #TokiPona #mention #uniwesita #translation #ante_toki #pana_toki #anno2016
    The Study of Machine Translation Aspects Through Constructed Languages Evangelos C. Papakitsos1, *, Ioannis Giachos2 1Department of Education, School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, Iraklio Attikis, Greece 2Department of Linguistics, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract The present paper describes a software system that performs bidirectional machine translation between two constructed languages. These languages are made by one or more persons, for various purposes. Such an important purpose is the development of easy and almost natural communication interfaces with robots. Despite the linguistic simplicity of the constructed languages, the automated translation from one to the other confronts some of the fundamental algorithmic challenges that are also encountered in the machine translation of natural languages. Hence, the usage of constructed languages can be an easier way both to train linguistic engineers in developing machine translation software and to study the linking of different robotic interfaces, as a novel field of research. Keywords Natural Language Understanding, Constructed Language, Machine Translation, Human-Computer Interaction Received: June 13, 2016 Accepted: June 25, 2016 Published online: July 21, 2016 @ 2016 The Authors. Published by American Institute of Science. This Open Access article is under the CC BY license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ http://files.aiscience.org/journal/article/html/70580008.html #TokiPona #mention #uniwesita #translation #ante_toki #pana_toki #anno2016
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Saturday, 24 March 2012
    University Challenge - Grand Final
    Manchester University v. Pembroke College, Cambridge

    [...]
    Luke Kelly increased his team’s lead with the words iconic and ironic. Quotations bonuses followed, and I was saddened to see Manchester fail to identify my favourite poem , Keats’ Ode to Autumn. They took the other two, though. Ben Pugh took another flyer on the next and lost five, allowing Luke Kelly in with the term Steampunk for a genre of Science Fiction set in worlds where things are run on clockwork mechanisms – something like that anyway. Was this the decisive break for Manchester ? Bonuses followed on Toki Pona – see below – and Manchester managed one of these. They weren’t steaming ahead, but then it was never that type of match. The hardy perennial Planets Suite provided the music starter, and Michael McKenna was first in to identify Mercury – good shout there, I thought. Now, this was the final, and so for the bonuses they had to identify the planet, but also its largest moon. Only Mars and Phobos fell to them. Ben Pugh stopped the rot with the next starter. We’ve had the acronym BRIC before – was it last series or the previous one ? – and he knew that we were dealing with brazil – Russia – India – China. Bonuses on plant cytology provoked wry smiles between the team members, and two passes and an incorrect answer were the result. Ben Pugh took his second in a row with the Swedish chemist Berzelius. Psychological experiments brought them two bonuses, and narrowed the gap to 55 points. This time it was Luke Kelly who twitched on the buzzer, on a set of cryptic clues to Bali, which lost Manchester 5, bringing them back below 100, and allowed Ed Bankes to supply the correct answer. Bonuses on angles followed. I was really pleased with myself for remembering the angle of incidence. Pembroke didn’t manage to add to their store with this bonus. Luke Kelly took back those 5 points and more besides with the next starter on the term Civil Society. Manchester’s bonuses on volcanoes allowed them to add another 10 points. The gap now stood at 60 – not insurmountable by any stretch of the imagination, but it was looking like a large gap in this match considering that we had now reached the 20 minute mark.
    [...]

    [...]
    Interesting Fact Of The Week That I Didn’t Already Know

    Toki Pona is an experimental language created in 2001 – it has no letter B
    [...]

    https://lifeaftermastermind.blogspot.com/2012/03/university-challenge-grand-final_24.html

    #TokiPona #sona #uniwesita #anno2012
    Saturday, 24 March 2012 University Challenge - Grand Final Manchester University v. Pembroke College, Cambridge [...] Luke Kelly increased his team’s lead with the words iconic and ironic. Quotations bonuses followed, and I was saddened to see Manchester fail to identify my favourite poem , Keats’ Ode to Autumn. They took the other two, though. Ben Pugh took another flyer on the next and lost five, allowing Luke Kelly in with the term Steampunk for a genre of Science Fiction set in worlds where things are run on clockwork mechanisms – something like that anyway. Was this the decisive break for Manchester ? Bonuses followed on Toki Pona – see below – and Manchester managed one of these. They weren’t steaming ahead, but then it was never that type of match. The hardy perennial Planets Suite provided the music starter, and Michael McKenna was first in to identify Mercury – good shout there, I thought. Now, this was the final, and so for the bonuses they had to identify the planet, but also its largest moon. Only Mars and Phobos fell to them. Ben Pugh stopped the rot with the next starter. We’ve had the acronym BRIC before – was it last series or the previous one ? – and he knew that we were dealing with brazil – Russia – India – China. Bonuses on plant cytology provoked wry smiles between the team members, and two passes and an incorrect answer were the result. Ben Pugh took his second in a row with the Swedish chemist Berzelius. Psychological experiments brought them two bonuses, and narrowed the gap to 55 points. This time it was Luke Kelly who twitched on the buzzer, on a set of cryptic clues to Bali, which lost Manchester 5, bringing them back below 100, and allowed Ed Bankes to supply the correct answer. Bonuses on angles followed. I was really pleased with myself for remembering the angle of incidence. Pembroke didn’t manage to add to their store with this bonus. Luke Kelly took back those 5 points and more besides with the next starter on the term Civil Society. Manchester’s bonuses on volcanoes allowed them to add another 10 points. The gap now stood at 60 – not insurmountable by any stretch of the imagination, but it was looking like a large gap in this match considering that we had now reached the 20 minute mark. [...] [...] Interesting Fact Of The Week That I Didn’t Already Know Toki Pona is an experimental language created in 2001 – it has no letter B [...] https://lifeaftermastermind.blogspot.com/2012/03/university-challenge-grand-final_24.html #TokiPona #sona #uniwesita #anno2012
    University Challenge - Grand Final
    Manchester University v. Pembroke College, Cambridge University Challenge Finals night is always something to look forward to. In the blue...
    LIFEAFTERMASTERMIND.BLOGSPOT.COM
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • blinry's
    Advent Calendar of Curiosities
    2017-12-20:
    Toki Pona

    Toki Pona is a minimalist, constructed language created in 2001 by Sonja Lang of Toronto. It only has 120 root words, and uses 14 letters.

    The name of the language means "good language" or "simple language" in Toki Pona. It is not a language for talking about big things, for example, there are no words for numbers except for "ala" (nothing), "wan" (one) and "tu" (two).

    More complex concepts can be constructed by combining two or more base words together - for example, "monsuta waso pi pan linja" literally means "bird-like monster of line-like bread", which describes the flying spaghetti monster.

    sike mama, a translation of Andy Weir's beautiful short story The Egg
    My favorite Toki Pona lessons are written by jan Lope

    https://advent.morr.cc/2017/20

    #TokiPona #ijo_nasa #anno2017
    blinry's Advent Calendar of Curiosities 2017-12-20: Toki Pona Toki Pona is a minimalist, constructed language created in 2001 by Sonja Lang of Toronto. It only has 120 root words, and uses 14 letters. The name of the language means "good language" or "simple language" in Toki Pona. It is not a language for talking about big things, for example, there are no words for numbers except for "ala" (nothing), "wan" (one) and "tu" (two). More complex concepts can be constructed by combining two or more base words together - for example, "monsuta waso pi pan linja" literally means "bird-like monster of line-like bread", which describes the flying spaghetti monster. sike mama, a translation of Andy Weir's beautiful short story The Egg My favorite Toki Pona lessons are written by jan Lope https://advent.morr.cc/2017/20 #TokiPona #ijo_nasa #anno2017
    Toki Pona
    *Toki Pona* is a minimalist, constructed language created in 2001 by Sonja Lang of Toronto. It only has 120 root words, and uses 14 letters. The name of the language means
    ADVENT.MORR.CC
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • How to create a learner persona to boost sales and student outcomes
    Philip Seifi | Jan 25, 2018

    [...]
    Linguist Liam
    Language learning is his passion, in and of itself. He is a jack of all languages, but a master of none except IPA and Toki Pona. He has tried hundreds of online resources but always comes back to his trusty pen and paper. He spends a lot of money on his hobby, but mostly in terms of polyglot conference tickets and journal subscriptions.
    [...]

    https://medium.com/edulift/how-to-create-a-learner-persona-to-boost-sales-and-student-outcomes-95c5a545a0f5

    #TokiPona #mention #sona #anno2018
    How to create a learner persona to boost sales and student outcomes Philip Seifi | Jan 25, 2018 [...] Linguist Liam Language learning is his passion, in and of itself. He is a jack of all languages, but a master of none except IPA and Toki Pona. He has tried hundreds of online resources but always comes back to his trusty pen and paper. He spends a lot of money on his hobby, but mostly in terms of polyglot conference tickets and journal subscriptions. [...] https://medium.com/edulift/how-to-create-a-learner-persona-to-boost-sales-and-student-outcomes-95c5a545a0f5 #TokiPona #mention #sona #anno2018
    How to create a learner persona to boost sales and student outcomes
    Meet Nantale, a 21-year-old mother-to-be from Nairobi.
    MEDIUM.COM
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Allophone


    [...]
    Languages such as Hawaiian and Toki Pona have a small phoneme inventory; thus there is much allophonic variation, which is used to distinguish between words and meanings. Allophones are best understood within the context of the language within which they occur. Additional areas of research for more understanding of allophones might include allophonic rule, allomorphs, linguistic alternation, phonemes, complementary distribution, free variation, and positional variants.
    [...]

    https://www.ultius.com/glossary/linguistics/allophone.html

    #TokiPona #allophone #kalama_sama #sona_kalama #phonology
    Allophone [...] Languages such as Hawaiian and Toki Pona have a small phoneme inventory; thus there is much allophonic variation, which is used to distinguish between words and meanings. Allophones are best understood within the context of the language within which they occur. Additional areas of research for more understanding of allophones might include allophonic rule, allomorphs, linguistic alternation, phonemes, complementary distribution, free variation, and positional variants. [...] https://www.ultius.com/glossary/linguistics/allophone.html #TokiPona #allophone #kalama_sama #sona_kalama #phonology
    Allophone | Linguistics | Linguistics | Glossary | Ultius
    An allophone is a set of subtly different ways of saying a sound within the context of a word that does not change the meaning of the word in question.
    WWW.ULTIUS.COM
    0 Comments 0 Shares
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google LLC.